UCLA researchers develop new device for predicting and analyzing risk of harmful algal blooms

September 19, 2018
Harmful algal bloom
NOAA

Algal blooms, or a sudden increase in algae populations, threaten marine ecosystem health by producing harmful biotoxins and by depleting bodies of water of oxygen. UCLA researchers led by Aydogan Ozcan, the UCLA Chancellor’s Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and associate director of the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA, developed a new portable device that can analyze the risk of harmful algal blooms in water samples faster, and at a lower cost, than previous technologies.

The new flow cytometer device instantly analyzes water samples, and provides real-time insights into the location, size and severity of possible algal blooms. This immediate knowledge could help to inform officials’ response times when managing coastal areas exposed to algal blooms, and could also help scientists prevent its harmful effects. Algal blooms have been increasing in frequency due in part to climate change, endangering ecosystem health across the United States. Ozcan’s report was published online by Light: Science & Applications.

Professor Ozcan’s research team included:

Zoltán Gorocs (Postdoctoral Resarcher, Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Miu Tamamitsu (Visiting Research Fellow of The Nakajima Foundation Scholarship for his MS/Ph.D. study at Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA) –
Vittorio Bianco (Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Patrick Wolf (Undegraduate Researcher, Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Shounak Roy (Undegraduate Researcher, Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Koyoshi Shindo (Undegraduate Researcher, Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Kyrollos Yanny (Undegraduate Researcher, Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Hatice Ceylan Koydemir (Postdoctoral Researcher, Ozcan Research Group, UCLA)
Yair Rivenson (Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA)

 

For more information, visit UCLA Newsroom.