Archive Tag: Clinical Research

Current UCLA Students are invited to Participate in the internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) Study

UCLA is currently recruiting students for an iCBT Study as part of the Depression Grand Challenge (DGC) campus initiative. The iCBT Student Study is the first attempt by the DGC to implement a tiered treatment plan for depressed individuals dependent on severity of symptoms of depression or anxiety. Using an initial online screening tool, participants will be Read more

UCLA research shows that the drug, ibudilast, reduces people’s craving for alcohol and appears to improve their ability to recover from a stressful situation.
Sebastian Hernandez/UCLA

UCLA researchers have discovered a new drug that could help people overcome alcoholism. Participants taking the medication, ibudilast, experienced significantly lower cravings for alcohol than when taking the placebo. Not only did ibudilast dampen alcohol cravings, but it also improved participants’ moods after being shown their preferred alcoholic beverage. Researchers also found Read more

A woman receives a swine flu vaccine in the eastern German city of Dresden on November 4, 2009.
NORBERT MILLAUER/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

George Slavich is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and director of the Laboratory for Stress Assessment and Research at UCLA. Slavich and Rebecca Brachman, neuroscientist at Columbia University, provide commentary on current research projects at Columbia University developing a type of vaccine or long-lasting injection that Read more

A person undergoes an electroencephalogram in this stock image. UCLA researchers say an electroencephalogram performed in a doctor's office can quickly show whether an individual is responding favorably to an antidepressant.
A person undergoes an electroencephalogram in this stock image. UCLA researchers say an electroencephalogram performed in a doctor’s office can quickly show whether an individual is responding favorably to an antidepressant.
iStock.com/Latsalomao

Researchers at Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA have discovered a noninvasive way to predict which individuals will respond favorably to antidepressant treatments using brain wave recordings. Frontline antidepressant medications are ineffective for many patients, but it can take weeks for patients to identify symptom improvement. Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Read more