Archive Tag: Clinical Research

A woman receives a swine flu vaccine in the eastern German city of Dresden on November 4, 2009.
NORBERT MILLAUER/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

George Slavich is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and director of the Laboratory for Stress Assessment and Research at UCLA. Slavich and Rebecca Brachman, neuroscientist at Columbia University, provide commentary on current research projects at Columbia University developing a type of vaccine or long-lasting injection that Read more

A person undergoes an electroencephalogram in this stock image. UCLA researchers say an electroencephalogram performed in a doctor's office can quickly show whether an individual is responding favorably to an antidepressant.
A person undergoes an electroencephalogram in this stock image. UCLA researchers say an electroencephalogram performed in a doctor’s office can quickly show whether an individual is responding favorably to an antidepressant.
iStock.com/Latsalomao

Researchers at Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA have discovered a noninvasive way to predict which individuals will respond favorably to antidepressant treatments using brain wave recordings. Frontline antidepressant medications are ineffective for many patients, but it can take weeks for patients to identify symptom improvement. Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Read more

Girls with ADHD often struggle with defiance, conduct issues

Irene Tung and Steve Lee, from UCLA psychology, conducted a research review concluding that girls with ADHD are more likely to have issues with defiance and acting out than problems with depression or anxiety. Girls with ADHD are more than 5 times as likely to have oppositional defiant disorder and more than 9 times as likely have conduct disorder. Across the general population, Read more

UCLA’s research introduced mindfulness training early in the recovery process with encouraging results.
UCLA’s research introduced mindfulness training early in the recovery process with encouraging results.
Spirit-Fire/Flickr

UCLA associate professor at UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Dr. Suzette Glasner, is the lead author of a recent study focusing on the impact of mindfulness training on addiction relapse. This clinical study, published in the journal Mindfulness, provides evidence showing that mindfulness training can prevent relapse among adults struggling with addiction to stimulants. Chronic stimulant use often leads users into spiraling depression or anxiety, and this mindfulness training teaches addicts how to cope with uncomfortable withdrawal emotions. Between the mindfulness group and control group in the clinical study, participants receiving mindfulness training were significantly less likely to relapse at the end of treatment and a month after treatment.

Read more at UCLA Newsroom