Archive Tag: Ecosystem Health

Mountain lion P-22 is seen prowling Griffith Park in a remote photo.
Miguel Ordenana

P-22, Griffith Park’s most famous mountain lion, has been very lucky so far. Survival for these predators is rare in the Los Angeles region. The small, eight-square mile park where P-22 resides has no connection to other wilderness areas and is extensively visited by humans, leaving many species with no choice but to adapt to urban life. Biologists hope that wilderness corridors will connect Read more

Maya Edelman/CALeDNA

CALeDNA, an app-based program developed by the University of California, aims to revolutionize conservation in California by engaging citizen scientists in the collection of environmental DNA. The project is led by Robert Wayne, a UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology. Wayne hopes CALeDNA will contribute to the construction of an “environmental DNA museum,” Read more

New America Media
New America Media

A recent poll commissioned by UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability indicates that issues of access to the coast still pose a significant barrier for low-income communities and communities of color around the state. Time, cost, and transportation were cited as the greatest challenges facing these communities. Jon Christensen, a professor with the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, notes that while the aim of the California Coastal Act—to ensure that all Californians have equal access to the coast—is noble, inequalities persist.

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Dr. in conversation
Richard (“Dick”) Jackson, MD, MPH (Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA) in conversation with host, Tavis Smiley (right).
© 2016 The Smiley Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Richard (“Dick”) Jackson, MD, MPH, a professor at the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, appeared in a 10-minute segment of the October 27, 2016 Tavis Smiley Show, to discuss the importance of improving and designing healthy environments and communities. He covers topics related to environmental justice, walkable communities and physical health. Jackson has spent over a decade studying the effects of architecture and urban planning on the physical, mental, and social well-being of people and is considered an expert on the “built environment.”  

Watch the segment at PBS

Restoration of the L.A. River may help provide more food, such as non-native turtles, crayfish and snails, to support native birds, including the great blue heron, shown above, in the L.A. River.
Restoration of the L.A. River may help provide more food, such as non-native turtles, crayfish and snails, to support native birds, including the great blue heron, shown above, in the L.A. River.
UCLA

Brad Shaffer, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at UCLA, comments on the revitalization of the L.A. river. According to Shaffer, the feasibility of restoration efforts must be considered in the context of human’s changes to the natural environment. Ultimately, he identifies the river as “a fascinating example of urban ecology, where species’ adaptive resilience can be observed in the presence of dense human development.”

Read more at UCLA Newsroom