Archive Tag: External Coverage

Nelson Freimer interviewed on KTVU San Francisco about UCLA’s recently launched study in collaboration with Apple

Nelson Freimer, director of the UCLA Depression Grand Challenge (DGC), appeared on KTVU San Francisco to discuss the DGC’s pilot research project in collaboration with Apple. The study – which seeks to develop more objective measures for detecting depression and anxiety – is designed so that all aspects of participation can be accomplished remotely. Nelson commented that physical distancing and other changes related to the COVID-19 pandemic have highlighted the importance of incorporating technologies like those to be tested in this study into clinical research and treatment.

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August 4, 2020 marks an important milestone for the UCLA Depression Grand Challenge (DGC) – the beginning of a pilot research project in collaboration with Apple. The study seeks to develop more objective measures for detecting depression and anxiety, an integral part of the Depression Grand Challenge goals. Methods for detecting depression have remained virtually unchanged for approximately 100 years. UCLA is honored to help shape the foundational tools for diagnosis and for the promise that such tools might eventually enable us to link discovery research and treatment.

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Drinking water quality findings from the 2019 Sustainable LA Grand Challenge (SLA GC) Environmental Report Card for Los Angeles County Water were featured in a Cronkite News/Arizona PBS story about lead contamination in California public schools and communities. Lead can leak into drinking water from old pipes and infrastructure, and there is no state requirement for testing drinking water at the tap in homes.

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A New York Times article about the City of Los Angeles’ efforts to increase shade in underserved neighborhoods referenced a Alex Hall et al.’s 2015 study on climate modeling published in the Journal of Climate which found that the number of days in Downtown L.A. when temperatures top 95 degrees could nearly triple by 2050.

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